Elegant Ribbon Loop Headband

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Our amazing ribbon guru, Nicole, found this lovely grosgrain ribbon headband on Pinterest and decided to try her hand at recreating it. We took step-by-step pictures so you could make your own!

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You will need:
a wide plastic headband,
7/16″ wide strong double sided tape (we like either Meriken or Wonder Tape brand),
1 1/4 yards of 3/4″ wide grosgrain ribbon,
1/2 yard of 1 1/2″ wide grosgrain ribbon,
hot glue gun and glue sticks,
and scissors.

Begin by cutting the narrower grosgrain ribbon into
twelve 3″ pieces,
one 6″ piece,
and one 2 1/2″ piece.
Leave the wide grosgrain ribbon in one piece.

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Cover one side of the wide grosgrain ribbon with double sided tape and peel off the backing. Lay the ribbon, sticky tape side down and centered, on the plastic headband and fold ends over. You will have some ribbon overhanging the edge of the headband, so wrap that around and press it onto the underside of the headband.

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Take the twelve 3″ pieces of narrow ribbon and fold in half. Apply a small line of hot glue on one end and press the other end onto it, creating a tear-drop shaped loop. Repeat for each 3″ piece so you have twelve loops.

Put the headband on and determine how low you want your ribbon loops to go. We chose to start just above the ear. With the loop-side down, glue the first loop straight onto the covered headband, aligned with the edges. Glue the next loop above and overlapping the first, and angled to the left. Then glue the next loop above and to the right. Continue gluing the loops in this pattern.

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Create a bow with the remaining pieces of narrow grosgrain ribbon. Overlap the ends of the 6″ piece of ribbon to create a round loop. Flatten the loop with the overlapped ends in the center and glue to secure. Wrap your last piece of ribbon, the 2 1/2″ piece around the center and glue. Finally, glue this bow onto the headband, overlapping the ends of your last loop.

Helpful Hints: Fray check can be used on the cut ends of the ribbon to prevent them from fraying.

RibbonLoopHeadband-Finished

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We think the finished headband looks simple and sophisticated. It’s perfect for when you still want to be a bit girly, but without fussy frills. Where will you wear this pretty, elegant accessory?

Homestate Shaped Corkboard

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We’ve seen some really cool ideas for cutting shaped corkboards on Pinterest and we thought it would be so cute to make one to show some Washington pride! Of course you could make this in any shape you like but how sweet would this be for a college student going to school out of state? Functional for notes and also a little reminder of home.

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After we made this I realized we hadn’t gotten any pictures to illustrate how to make it (do you ever get so excited to do a project all other things fly out of your head? yeah? us too!) so I remade a mini version to show you all. You really can make this whatever size you like!

All you need is:
corkboard backed with foamcore
template of shape to cut
permanent marker
cutting blade

I also used scissors to precut my template and some pushpins to hold the template on the corkboared while I traced around it, but they didn’t make it into the picture. The size of corkboard you need will be determined by your desired finished size. We carry a foamcore-backed corkboard that is 20×30″ so we used that size and made our template as big as would fit. On the mini version I just used a scrap that was about 4×5″.

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To create your template, either draw or print the image at the size you have chosen. If you choose to print your image and it is larger than standard printer paper, either have it printed at a printshop like Kinko’s or print it tiled on your home computer and tape the pieces together. Cut out the image with scissors and attach it to the corkboard with pushpins. Trace around the outside with a permanent marker. Try to make your line thick and even but you can always touch it up after you do your cutting.

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Remove the template and cut around the outside of the drawn line, right at the edge. Ideally, you do not want to cut off much of your black line since that helps it stand out nicely against your wall. Usually you will need to go over a section of line a few times with your blade to cut through the thickness of corkboard and foamcore. (Please don’t cut on a nice wood surface like your dining room table without a cutting mat below. I just used our wood counter for photo-taking purposes, but when I actually cut I always use a self healing mat.)

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Easter Basket Tutu

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What little girl doesn’t love a fun and frilly tutu for dress-up? Easter is coming up and a pretty pastel one seems like just the thing. Why not slip one of these tulle confections onto an Easter basket for a fun surprise she’ll enjoy even after all the chocolate and jelly beans are gone?

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To make this, follow our instructions for a basic tutu, making sure the elastic is large enough to fit around your chosen basket, and secure if necessary (we used monofilament because it’s pretty much invisible but wire or sewing thread would work too). Then just fill your basket with all sorts of cute Easter eggs! We found so many fun painted, chalkboard, glittered, and decoupage eggs on Pinterest (are you following us? you should be!) so if you’re inspired by the contents of our basket too, check out the links that inspired us.¬†Whatever you do, have a happy, crafty Easter!

Totally Tutu

Here at the craft store, we are totally obsessed with tutus! They’re fun for any occasion, and any age (we’ve even seen some made for dogs! woah!) so get your supplies together and get crafting!

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You can choose to use all one color tulle or mix up several fun colors. Similar shades look nice but adding a contrasting color can be bold and fun too. For a small child, toddler, or infant you may need less tulle but for a teen or adult we recommend at least 3 or 4 rolls of 25 yards each (more if you want it extra full or long). Use at least 1 inch wide elastic as narrower elastic may dig into the waist and be uncomfortable.

To begin, measure and cut elastic to fit your waist so it fits snugly where you plan to wear your tutu. Overlap cut ends of the elastic about an inch and hand stitch to secure. This part doesn’t have to be pretty since it will all be covered by tulle in the finished tutu. Just make sure it will hold! Cut your tulle into strips twice as long as you want your finished tutu to be.

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Take a piece of tulle and tie it onto the elastic. The neatest knot is a lark’s head knot (just learned the name of this super simple knot I use all the time!) which is shown below. Simply fold your length of tulle in half and place it behind the elastic. Bring the ends around to the front and slip them through the loop of tulle. Pull ends of tulle until the knot is secure against the elastic and adjust as needed.

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Continue tying knots in this manner until your tutu is full enough to your liking. A shorter tutu will look fuller with less tulle but a long one will needs lots and lots of pieces if you want it big and fluffy. Make it just how YOU like it!

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Helpful Hints: Try slipping the elastic over something like a box or chair that will hold it taut while still allowing you to easily tie pieces of tulle on. For this one I used a basket that was just the right size. Sometimes craft projects seem like they require an extra pair of hands just to hold everything but this one can totally be done without growing an extra pair!